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The place to see what's new at the Sarah Lawrence College William Schuman Music Library. Updated by Music Librarian Charlotte E. Price.
Who I Follow

librarysleevefacing:

Of all the places to be in the library, the Music Library seems the most grounded to Ramsey Lewis.

jstor:

Today is the official launch of JSTOR Daily! It’s a new online magazine that features articles and blog posts that draw upon the wealth of scholarship on JSTOR to contextualize the modern world. Check it out and follow my colleagues on Twitter @JSTOR_Daily for updates. 

lincolncenter:

God, That’s Good! [x]

See the whole thing on Live From Lincoln Center on Friday! Check local listings

Worth finding a TV on campus with cable!

nprmusic:

funnyordie:

So Far, This Fifth Grader’s Diary Entry is the Most Punk Rock Thing Ever

Nothing screams punk like i’s dotted with hearts.

"But if the Dead Kennedies do not like the man so don’t I." Is there a single-tear emoticon? —Lars

32 plays
Chinbat Bassankhuu,
The Art of the Mongolian Yatga

Award-winning musician Chinbat Baassankhuu has recently come out with an album based on the Mongolian yatga, a plucked zither related to the Chinese guzheng.

On The Art of the Mongolian Yatga (ARC Music, 2014), the pieces are a variety of traditional compositions and contemporary ones, some of which are by Baassanhkuu herself.

This piece, “An Elegant Saddle,” is by Mongolian composer B. Sharav, composed for the 21-string yatga. Stop by the SLC Music Library and check out the entire CD.

slcdaps:

Campus Conversation on Race: Ferguson, MO

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

5:30-7:00pm, Heimbold 208

Refreshments Served

nprmusic:

Happy birthday, John Coltrane! Hear a two-part audio documentary on the saxophone icon: Part 1, Part 2

Need some more Coltrane? The SLC Music Library has plenty of streaming albums and CDs by him. Or stop by the Main Library to grab some books about Coltrane’s music and life!

Starting today and continuing for one month, Sarah Lawrence students and faculty have access to the fabulous Met Opera On Demand database.

Using this link and logging in with your MySLC info, you can access it at home or on campus.

Please try it out and let Charlotte the Music Librarian know what you think. The link is located on the library page under “M” Databases.

vagueversusvogue:

barbie-teacatch:

al-grave:

"What do you play? The Clarinet, you? I play the fucking HAMMER"

I MEAN THE OTHER PLAYER’S FACES THO

the dude in the back knew it was coming, the other dude forgot

The sound of the hammer, which features in the last movement, was stipulated by Mahler to be “brief and mighty, but dull in resonance and with a non-metallic character (like the fall of an axe).” The sound achieved in the premiere did not quite carry far enough from the stage, and indeed the problem of achieving the proper volume while still remaining dull in resonance remains a challenge to the modern orchestra. Various methods of producing the sound have involved a wooden mallet striking a wooden surface, a sledgehammer striking a wooden box, or a particularly large bass drum, or sometimes simultaneous use of more than one of these methods. - Wikipedia
Watch the full symphony here, and a debate on the number of hammer blows here.

vagueversusvogue:

barbie-teacatch:

al-grave:

"What do you play? The Clarinet, you? I play the fucking HAMMER"

I MEAN THE OTHER PLAYER’S FACES THO

the dude in the back knew it was coming, the other dude forgot

The sound of the hammer, which features in the last movement, was stipulated by Mahler to be “brief and mighty, but dull in resonance and with a non-metallic character (like the fall of an axe).” The sound achieved in the premiere did not quite carry far enough from the stage, and indeed the problem of achieving the proper volume while still remaining dull in resonance remains a challenge to the modern orchestra. Various methods of producing the sound have involved a wooden mallet striking a wooden surface, a sledgehammer striking a wooden box, or a particularly large bass drum, or sometimes simultaneous use of more than one of these methods. - Wikipedia

Watch the full symphony here, and a debate on the number of hammer blows here.

Another recent acquisition will benefit any singers. Exploring Art Song Lyrics: Translation and Pronunciation of the Italian, German, and French Repertoire (Oxford University Press, 2012) by Jonathan Retzlaff with IPA transcriptions by Cheri Montgomery, does just what it says.

With clear, basic translations and a very helpful phonetic alphabet guide at the end, this is a highly useful reference for singers. Stop by the SLC Music Library Reference section and take a look!

12 plays
Koko Taylor,
The Earthshaker

Koko Taylor was the definition of a belter. Her powerful voice is perfect for blues. Earthshaker (Alligator Records, 1978) is one of our latest additions to the SLC Music Library’s blues collection. Check it out!

beatonna:

Broadside Ballads from the Bodleian libraries hosts a great collection.  I am especially impressed by the fantastic illustration archive, divided into neat and specific categories.  Go look!

beatonna:

The University of California’s English Broadside Ballad Archive is also a fantastic project, with a dedicated team making previously hard to find (on microfiche or in archive) broadsides available to everyone, and transcribed to modern eyes and ears.  Amazing.  What we have online is amazing.